New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission Report of 1976

In 1976, the main façade of the Smallpox Hospital was more intact and the building was surrounded by many more trees, New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission

In 1976, the main façade of the Smallpox Hospital was more intact and the building was surrounded by many more trees, New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission is a city agency that oversees Landmarks Preservation law. This set of laws was established by Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. in 1965 to preserve designated buildings and sites of historic, architectural, or cultural importance. On March 23, 1976, the Smallpox Hospital (which, by then, was a ruin) was designated a New York City Landmark by the commission. These four gorgeous black-and-white photograph were taken circa 1976 and were included in the building’s application for designation.

Today, we have published the full report, which you can find here.

Two bay windows supported by large timbers, New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission

Two bay windows supported by large timbers, New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission

The main entrance porch of the Smallpox Hospital, New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission

The main entrance porch of the Smallpox Hospital, New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission

The building's western façade, New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission

The building's western façade, New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission